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Baltic anomaly Burned organic material found on Baltic anomaly rock sample
04/17/2013

Stockholm, Sweden -- Preliminary lab tests made by different experts at the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Institute of Archaeology in the Tel-Aviv University (Micromorphology of Archaeological Sediments and Infrared Spectroscopy) shows that a piece of basalt rock that was recovered from the circular shaped anomaly in the Baltic Sea has burned organic material on it. Further analyzes will hopefully show what kind of material it might be, and even try to date it.

In 2011 Dennis Asberg and Peter Lindberg did what maybe was the biggest discovery in their entire life.

On 87 meters deep (285 feet) in the middle of the Baltic Sea, they discovered a circular object with a circumference of 180 meters (590 feet) and 60 meters (197 feet) in diameter.

They did two dives on the object together with their crew to try to figure out what is hidden beneath. A year later the mystery is still unsolved.

Around mid-summer 2012 they got to shore from their last expedition and today they leave again.

-We dived to the object twice; we already know that the object we have found is unique. What we are going to do now is to take a sample of the object itself, says Dennis Asberg.

Baltic anomaly analysis There has been different theories about what it might be, everything from a geological formation to a Russian submarine base.

Now the treasure hunters have found a hole on the object that leads right through it.

-It's not a missile silo and it's not a submarine. Maybe it is a little town down there, says Dennis Asberg.

-The circular shaped object mainly has caught the attention of the UFO enthusiasts. About 95% of everyone who is following the search, think that it is a UFO, Dennis Asberg says.

-A long time I thought that it might be a meteorite, but a meteorite would have created a much bigger mess on the surroundings and there is none. Off course you have to be realistic but this is strange, very strange.

Source: www.oceanexplorer.se

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